Adirondack

  • Montreal
  • Albany
  • New York
10 hours Train Numbers
68, 69
Frequency: Daily

The Adirondack travels daily from New York City, through the lush wine country of the Hudson Valley, into Montreal. Heading north, you're scheduled to depart New York's Penn Station in the morning and arrive in Montreal in the evening. Or, board the southbound train anywhere along the line and arrive in mid-town Manhattan in time to enjoy dinner and nightlife in New York City. Convenient connecting trains at New York extend your reach to Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington, DC.

Enjoy nature’s kaleidoscope of colors on the Adirondack, rated a “Top 10 Most Scenic Train Ride in the World” as you discover why hikers, leaf peepers and snow lovers make annual pilgrimages to Lake Champlain’s shores. Along the way, history comes alive in places like Saratoga Springs and Ticonderoga, while le enchantement of Montreal gives this journey a distinctively international flavor.

“Breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influence of the earth.” — Henry David Thoreau

Features & Amenities

Amenities vary by train.

Reserved Coach Class Seat

Accommodations vary by train.

Adirondack Cafe Car Menu

Downloadable menus are updated regularly, but menu items and prices are subject to change and may be different from what is available onboard.

Take your small dog or cat along with you on the train. Before you go, learn more about the types of pets allowed, pet reservations and fares, approved pet carriers and additional details.

See the Complete Pet Program Guidelines

Trails & Rails - Heritage Appreciation Onboard

Trails & Rails - Heritage Appreciation Onboard

Trails & Rails - Heritage Appreciation Onboard

Trails & Rails - Heritage Appreciation Onboard

An innovative partnership program between the National Park Service and Amtrak, the Trails & Rails program provides Amtrak passengers with educational opportunities to foster an appreciation of a selected region's natural and cultural heritage and renews the long tradition of associating railroads with National Parks.

Learn More about Trails & Rails